gradientlair:

Black women who made the Time 100 List For 2014. Creative singer, dancer, artist, philanthropist and feminist Beyoncé, creative outspoken actor, artist and feminist Kerry Washington, tennis legend, philanthropist and business owner Serena WilliamsChicagoan and now head of U.N. World Food Programme Ertharin CousinNigerian economist and past Finance Minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Ugandan activist Sister Rosemary Nyirumbe, South African human rights lawyer Thuli Madonsela, and Kenyan tech guru Ory Okolloh. 

Laverne Cox and Janet Mock DIDN’T make the list though. Clearly both had a major impact in 2013. Both have been outspoken about Black trans women and trans women of colour’s rights and lives, both have created remarkable and important art and both have been influential and highly visible. They should’ve been there. Easily.

Beyoncé made the Time 100 List in 2013 as well, but this year has the cover after a successful and influential year in 2013, from her Super Bowl performance, to her world tour, to her incredible visual album BEYONCÉ, to being more outspoken with her feminist politics through her music, and through other projects—some I like (speaking, writing, fundraising, philanthropy), some I’ve critiqued (i.e. #BanBossy/Lean In)—all while being committed to her family, her marriage to Jay-Z and motherhood to Blue Ivy

Several Black men made the list as well, including two of my personal faves, Oscar winning film director Steve McQueen and Super Bowl champion Richard Sherman

As I wrote about yesterday, there is a DIFFERENCE between the legitimate desire for representation of Black women’s humanity in the media while still creating our own media (as ignoring the mainstream does not erase harmful messages about us are placed there) and "oh that’s White approval!" This distinction and understanding of how media representation impacts us is important.

Complete Time 100 List For 2014 

(via parisdenise)

Tags: artnstyleaa

Orange is the new black. Prominent throughout all four fashion weeks, get ready to see orange everywhere. From a bold lip color, to vivid accents on accessories to clothing and shoes. How will you incorporate the season’s hottest color in to your spring look?

"Fashion On The Square. Its a Life Style!"


How many stories can you find in this photograph?  Simply amazing.
Culture Clash - Irie Marie | Houston, TX - Photographer | instagram.com/dejwill dejathakilla.tumblr.com.  


How many stories can you find in this photograph?  Simply amazing.

Culture Clash - Irie Marie | Houston, TX - Photographer | instagram.com/dejwill dejathakilla.tumblr.com.  

(Source: blackfashion)

Tags: artnstyleaa

Clean, spring, great length yet fierce.
Fashion On The Square - It’s A Lifestyle

Clean, spring, great length yet fierce.

Fashion On The Square - It’s A Lifestyle

(Source: moldavia, via helloomynameischelseaa)

A Salute To Women’s History Month - ANITA HILL
Anita Faye Hill (born July 30, 1956), most known for her testimony on Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, is an American attorney and academic, currently a professor of social policy, law and women’s studies at Brandeis University's Heller School for Social Policy and Management.   She became a national figure in 1991 when she alleged that U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had made harassing sexual statements as her supervisor at the U.S. Department of Education and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.  Due to lack of evidence supporting Hill’s allegations, Thomas was confirmed and took a seat on the Court. Hill’s testimony focused national attention on the issue of workplace sexual harassment. 
Hill was born in Lone Tree, Oklahoma, the youngest of the 13 children of Albert and Erma Hill, who were farmers.Her family hailed from Arkansas, where her great-grandparents and her maternal grandfather, Henry Eliot, were born into slavery. Hill was raised in the Baptist faith.
After graduating as valedictorian from Morris High School, Hill enrolled at Oklahoma State University, receiving a bachelor’s degree with honors, in psychology 1977. She went on to Yale Law School, obtaining her Juris Doctor degree with honors in 1980.
She was admitted to the District of Columbia Bar in 1980 and began her law career as an associate with the Washington, D.C. firm of Wald, Harkrader & Ross. In 1981, she became an attorney-adviser to Clarence Thomas who was then the Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights. When Thomas became Chairman of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in 1982, Hill went along to serve as his assistant, leaving the job in 1983.
Hill then became an assistant professor at the Evangelical Christian O. W. Coburn School of Law at Oral Roberts University where she taught from 1983 to 1986.In 1986, she joined the faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Law where she taught commercial law and contracts.

A Salute To Women’s History Month - ANITA HILL

Anita Faye Hill (born July 30, 1956), most known for her testimony on Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, is an American attorney and academic, currently a professor of social policy, law and women’s studies at Brandeis University's Heller School for Social Policy and Management.   She became a national figure in 1991 when she alleged that U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had made harassing sexual statements as her supervisor at the U.S. Department of Education and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.  Due to lack of evidence supporting Hill’s allegations, Thomas was confirmed and took a seat on the Court. Hill’s testimony focused national attention on the issue of workplace sexual harassment

Hill was born in Lone Tree, Oklahoma, the youngest of the 13 children of Albert and Erma Hill, who were farmers.Her family hailed from Arkansas, where her great-grandparents and her maternal grandfather, Henry Eliot, were born into slavery. Hill was raised in the Baptist faith.

After graduating as valedictorian from Morris High School, Hill enrolled at Oklahoma State University, receiving a bachelor’s degree with honors, in psychology 1977. She went on to Yale Law School, obtaining her Juris Doctor degree with honors in 1980.

She was admitted to the District of Columbia Bar in 1980 and began her law career as an associate with the Washington, D.C. firm of Wald, Harkrader & Ross. In 1981, she became an attorney-adviser to Clarence Thomas who was then the Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights. When Thomas became Chairman of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in 1982, Hill went along to serve as his assistant, leaving the job in 1983.

Hill then became an assistant professor at the Evangelical Christian O. W. Coburn School of Law at Oral Roberts University where she taught from 1983 to 1986.In 1986, she joined the faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Law where she taught commercial law and contracts.

Tags: artnstyleaa

International Women’s Day 8  

In honor of International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month, here’s a look a Judy Chicago’s marvelous The Dinner Party.This empowering ceremonial banquet consists of 39 place settings each honoring an important woman in history. 999 other women who’s name is handwritten on the tile floor are also commemorated. This installation is currently on display at the Brooklyn Museum in NY, if you have the chance its definitely one to see. The detail is incredible!

NANNIE HELEN BURROUGHS
March 4th - A Celebration of Women’s History Month
Nannie Helen Burroughs, nationally prominent Black educator, founded the National Training School for Women and Girls in Washington, D. C. (1909) as a national model school for the teaching of African American women. Believing that education, job training, and voting rights were the tools for Black women’s empowerment, Burroughs wrote an article in the Crisis (1915), official magazine of the NAACP, demanding the ballot as a protection for African American women and the route to racial advancement.

Burroughs graduated from high school with honors in Washington, D. C. in 1896.  Through her powerful oratory she became secretary of the National Baptist Woman’s Convention and, building on her teaching experience and grassroots network among Baptist women, she founded the National Training School for Women and Girls. Under the motto, “We Specialize in the Wholly Impossible,” her school blended industrial training and the liberal arts with a Christian education. She maintained her own publishing house, trained women missionaries, and educated African American women to be self-sufficient wage earners. She died in Washington in 1961; her school continues today.

NANNIE HELEN BURROUGHS

March 4th - A Celebration of Women’s History Month

Nannie Helen Burroughs, nationally prominent Black educator, founded the National Training School for Women and Girls in Washington, D. C. (1909) as a national model school for the teaching of African American women. Believing that education, job training, and voting rights were the tools for Black women’s empowerment, Burroughs wrote an article in the Crisis (1915), official magazine of the NAACP, demanding the ballot as a protection for African American women and the route to racial advancement.

Burroughs graduated from high school with honors in Washington, D. C. in 1896.  Through her powerful oratory she became secretary of the National Baptist Woman’s Convention and, building on her teaching experience and grassroots network among Baptist women, she founded the National Training School for Women and Girls. Under the motto, “We Specialize in the Wholly Impossible,” her school blended industrial training and the liberal arts with a Christian education. She maintained her own publishing house, trained women missionaries, and educated African American women to be self-sufficient wage earners. She died in Washington in 1961; her school continues today.

Tags: artnstyleaa

Be the center of attention in eye-catching red.
"Fashion On The Square. Its a Lifestyle!"

Be the center of attention in eye-catching red.

"Fashion On The Square. Its a Lifestyle!"

(via mynamesdiana)


Christian Siriano Fall 2014

Is black the new black?
"Fashion On The Square. Its a Life Style!"


Christian Siriano Fall 2014

Is black the new black?

"Fashion On The Square. Its a Life Style!"

(via fashionselection)

Is This Too Much Skin?
It’s nice to reveal some skin when showing a couture gown on the runway.  It can be distracting, however, when there is too much showing that takes the attention away from the flawless design work.  If you’re going to show some skin, keep it minimal. Focus on one section and cover the rest up. And, by the way, no idea where that ‘hair tail looking piece’ is coming from, but I am hopeful it is not a part of this beautiful dress.
"Fashion On The Square. Its A Life Style!"

Is This Too Much Skin?

It’s nice to reveal some skin when showing a couture gown on the runway.  It can be distracting, however, when there is too much showing that takes the attention away from the flawless design work.  If you’re going to show some skin, keep it minimal. Focus on one section and cover the rest up. And, by the way, no idea where that ‘hair tail looking piece’ is coming from, but I am hopeful it is not a part of this beautiful dress.

"Fashion On The Square. Its A Life Style!"